Tag Archives: Woolacombe

Found somewhere to develop my 35mm film

With the demise of Jessops in Barnstaple I thought I was going to struggle to get my 35mm colour film processed – I found a place in South Molton so the panic is over.

Swingboats Woolacombe Beach by 35mm_photographs

The image above was taken with my trusty Pentax P30 35mm camera (no 3702885) using an out of date roll of Kodak Gold film (Kodak GT 800-4). There is something sad about motionless swingboats.

These are on Woolacombe Beach and I always look forward to them being re-erected after the long winter – their colours and painted swirls bring the promise of  hope to the desolate beach.

The winter population of Woolaconbe is very small (around 1,000), but during the summer large numbers of people come to the village for their holidays. Many are motivated to visit because of the excellent surfing conditions found locally.

Swingboats Woolacombe Beach, a photo by 35mm_photographs on Flickr.

The Pentax P30, 35mm film camera  has a semi-automatic mode, which chooses most of the settings but allows for more creativity.

Pentax P30 has shutter speeds from 1/1000 of a second to 1 second. The automatic mode on this film camera chooses the best shutter speed and aperture setting for the natural light available.

In 1952 Asahi Optical introduced its first camera, the Asahiflex (the first Japanese SLR using 35mm film). The name “Pentax” was originally a registered trademark of the East German VEB Zeiss Ikon (from “Pentaprism” and “Contax”) but, as all Germans patents were annulled with the country’s defeat, the name “Pentax” was taken by the Asahi Optical in 1957. Since then the company has been primarily known for its photographic products, distributed under the name “Asahi Pentax” (equipment was imported to the United States from the 1950s until the mid-1970s by Honeywell Corporation and branded “Honeywell Pentax”). The company was renamed Pentax Corporation in 2002. It was one of the world’s largest optical companies, producing still cameras, binoculars, spectacle lenses, and a variety of other optical instruments. In 2004 Pentax had about 6000 employees.

Swingboats Woolacombe Beach


Jessops Europe Limited

Jessops Europe Limited, trading as Jessops, is a British photographic retailing company. It was founded in Leicester in 1935 by Frank Jessop and traded under the name of The Jessop Group Limited. The business entered administration on 9 January 2013 and all Jessops retail stores ceased trading on 11 January 2013 until the British entrepreneur Peter Jones invested several million pounds into the company and formed Jessops Europe Limited.

Six stores opened on 28th March 2013. The re-launch at Oxford Street in London on 28th March 2013 received a huge amount of media interest & was attended by celebrities including actor James Corden.

Creating a fake

Creating a real vintage looking image is better than creating a fake. This image was taken with a Pentax K1000 35mm camera in July 2012.

The Pentax K1000 is an almost all metal, mechanically (springs, gears, levers) controlled, manual-focus SLR with manual exposure control. It was completely operable without batteries. It only needed batteries (one A76 or S76, or LR44 or SR44) for the light metering information system. This consisted of a center-the-needle exposure control system using a galvanometer needle pointer moving between vertically arranged +/– over/underexposure markers at the right side of the viewfinder to indicate the readings of the built-in full-scene averaging, cadmium sulfide (CdS) light meter versus the actual camera settings. The meter did not have a true on/off switch and the lens cap needed to be kept on the lens to prevent draining the battery when the K1000 was not in use.

Pentax K1000. (2012, May 31). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:26, June 8, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pentax_K1000&oldid=495230110

The rise of Instagram,  a free photo sharing program that was launched in October 2010 is the best example of this ‘look back’ at analogue photography from the 20th century. This service allows users to take a photo and apply a digital retro filter to it and then share it on most social networking services. The distinctive retro feature of this app is that it converts photos, which in contemporary formats are rectangle, to a square shape, like Kodak Instamatic and Polaroid images of the 70s. The most common aspect ratios used in still camera photography, are 4:3, 3:2 (more recently in consumer cameras 16:9 is being used). Other used aspect ratios include 5:3, 5:4, and 1:1 which produces the square format. Most mobile devices have a 4:3 aspect ratio.

The problems of fragmentation and confusion that exist within more traditional art practices, such as painting and sculpture (in the broadest possible milieu) are mirrored in new art practices. Within these technological and new media categories, diverse concepts and imagery has been lumped together to form a hodgepodge of non-related methodologies and artworks.

What is this direction?

The meshing together of processes, unrelated imagery and the breaking down of barriers cannot be seen as a shortcut to intellectual credibility. The dedicated thought process that goes with the creative procedure should be one of intense reasoning. It is therefore unrealistic to expect the uneducated masses to use the computers prescriptive decision making to create ‘real art’. The birth of Photoshop has enabled everybody to create ‘non-intellectual’ versions of Rauschenberg (and Warhol) – this is not ART.

Don’t steal my art – you rat!

Dead Rat in Roof Guttering by This Window

There are people out there who will steal, copy and adapt your art for their own gain – this is not plagiarism it is theft.

Plagiarism is defined in dictionaries as the “wrongful appropriation,” “close imitation,” or “purloining and publication” of another author’s ” language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions,” and the representation of them as one’s own original work, but the notion remains problematic with nebulous boundaries.

These thieves are vermin, they are annoying and like their namesakes rats – they belong in the gutter.

They always say that imitation is a form of flattery.

A  rat’s ability to learn, has been investigated to see if they exhibit general intelligence like larger or more complex animals…the one in the above photograph wasn’t, it is now food for the flies.

Related articles


Gutter Rat – art theft

Dead Rat in Roof Guttering by This Window

There are people out there who will steal, copy and adapt your art for their own gain.

They always say that imitation is a form of flattery.

These vermin are annoying and like their namesakes rats – they belong in the gutter.

A  rat’s ability to learn, has been investigated to see if they exhibit general intelligence like larger or more complex animals…the one in the above photograph wasn’t, it is now food for the flies.


Photograph looking out over the Woolacombe Bay Hotel

Here is a view across out to Baggy Point, looking over the Woolacombe Bay Hotel. The photograph above was taken with a Pentax Spotmatic 35mm camera using ‘old stock’ (March 2000) Agfacolor HDC 200. I am really impressed with the … Continue reading ?

Looking out over the bay

View over Woolacombe

Here is a view across out to Baggy Point, looking over the Woolacombe Bay Hotel.

The photograph above was taken with a Pentax Spotmatic 35mm camera using ‘old stock’ (March 2000) Agfacolor HDC 200. I am really impressed with the vintage postcard look of this image – very 1950s. The slideshow below contains some images taken from the same roll of film, they have a distinctive red/brown tint.

It is fashionable to use vintage feel photographs in posts, on Facebook and on the web.

The rise of Instagram,  a free photo sharing program that was launched in October 2010 is the best example of this ‘look back’ at analogue photography from the 20th century. This service allows users to take a photo and apply a digital retro filter to it and then share it on most social networking services. The distinctive retro feature of this app is that it converts photos, which in contemporary formats are rectangle, to a square shape, like Kodak Instamatic and Polaroid images of the 70?s. The most common aspect ratios used in still camera photography, are 4:3, 3:2 (more recently in consumer cameras 16:9 is being used). Other used aspect ratios include 5:3, 5:4, and 1:1 which produces the square format. Most mobile devices have a 4:3 aspect ratio.

Images taken with a Pentax SP1000 35mm film camera

These images taken of Woolacombe were done using  a Pentax SP1000 35mm camera. This camera was my father’s, who bought it from new in the 1970s. All Pentax Spotmatics (SP) use the M42 screw-thread lens mount. The lenses are focused at maximum aperture to give a bright viewfinder image for focusing, then a switch at the side stops the lens down and switches on the metering to enable the exposure to be set prior to shutter release.

View down into WoolacombeMy beautiful pictureView down into WoolacombeView down into Woolacombe

I’m really getting into lens flare which is usually caused by a very bright light source, either affecting the image or shining into the lens, which produces a haze. I also like the slightly over cooked vintage feel of these images, scratches, dust, and fibre strands -35mm film is far more fun than digital.

Ilfracombe Harbour

The image above was taken in Ilfracombe – June 2012

Here is one we sold earlier

Whatever Happened to the Space Age

Original painting by Peter Bright  (aka This Window).

Media: Painting and Screen Print on canvas, signed and dated 2011.

Size: 400mm x 400mm £403.56

ARTIST + S T A T E M E N T …

Buzz Aldrin walks on the moon, July 20, 1969
Buzz Aldrin walks on the moon, July 20, 1969 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As an 11 year old I watched the first moon landing in 1969. I was mad about everything to do with space travel, I would read anything that was about rockets, cosmonauts and astronauts. Later in my life I shook the hand of a man who shook the hand of my all time hero Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin, that was for me like touching history, if only secondhand (excuse the pun).

I was rummaging through old boxes of stuff and found the newspaper cutting of an astronaut on the moon – yellowed and faded – it still makes my heart flutter. I wish I’d been to the moon.

‘BOLD and arresting artwork will catch the eye at West Buckland School this month. The striking exhibition of prints, drawings and paintings is by Woolacombe artist, Peter Bright.

In it, Peter revisits images and ideas from his past and re-execute them in print and paint.’

 

2002 #archive #paintings #drawings

The Radiographer

430mm x 700mm

 Vinyl, acrylic and oil paint on corrugated card. 

(Woolacombe July 2002)

This is the first in a series of ‘drawings’ I made using coloured transparent tapes.  A good friend of mine was working at the North Devon Hospital, as a junior doctor. She was the catalyst for these drawings. The hierarchy of the hospital system fascinated me. I would really like to see one or all of this series exhibited in a hospital or surgery.

Drawing is a visual art that makes use of any number of drawing instruments to mark a two-dimensional medium. Common instruments include graphite pencils, pen and ink, inked brushes, wax color pencils, crayons, charcoals, chalk, pastels, markers, stylus, or various metals like silverpoint.

The Consultant 540mm x 790mm

 Vinyl, acrylic and oil paint on corrugated card. (Woolacombe July 2002)

There are eight images in the ‘Hospital’ series.

An artist who practices or works in drawing may be referred to as a draftsman or draughtsman.

The most common support for drawing is paper, although other materials such as cardboard, plastic, leather, canvas and board, may be used. Temporary drawings may be made on a blackboard or whiteboard, or indeed almost anything. The medium has also become popular as a means of public expression via graffiti art, because of the easy availability of permanent markers.

Drawing. (2012, January 13). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11:33, February 4, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Drawing&oldid=471216587

The Quay ( 3 canvases size 450mm x 300mm)

Acrylic and oil paint on canvas. (Woolacombe/Bromsgrove July 2002)

Made these simple paintings to explore organic shapes and colours. I also wanted to see if I could explode/echo/repeat motifs across several paintings, to create a logical transition with a suggestion of language and rhythm. The inspiration for these paintings is the quay/harbour area of Ilfracombe in North Devon. I am fascinated by the way the tides move and change the landscape, a constant moving swell, every moment a different image. The colours and light of Devon have changed my approach towards painting; the dullness of the industrial Midlands has now been replaced with the clean, pure colours of my Woolacombe home.