Tag Archives: travel

Drawing from 1978 – exhibited in Illfracombe as part of a major event

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The image above is a drawing I did in 1978, which is part lithograph and part sketch in oils. It is now part of an exhibition in the coastal town of Ilfracombe.

Over this weekend, in the Landmark Pavilion, Sea Ilfracombe will be hosting a major event, which will include exhibitions from professional artists, as well as artwork from Ilfracombe’s schools and community college.

Why is most public art crap?

Puerto Calero - Lanzarote

The term public art is especially significant within the art world, amongst curators, commissioning bodies and practitioners of public art, to whom it signifies a particular working practice, often with implications of site specificity.

The need to display art in a public place is usually driven by the ego of a local authority or prominent business or public figure within in a community. Placing grandiose statements within a town or city is seen as a way of increasing the importance of a place. There is a misconception that art elevates and rejuvenates an area – this is incorrect. There is more bad public art than there is good – out of proportion statues of footballers for an example.

The public art I like is the simple three-dimensional representation of company logos – signage is great public art.

Image above – Puerto Calero – Lanzarote

I have no idea what the sculpture placed in the entrance to Puerto Calero marina is all about (I don’t really need to) I love the way it simply sits there and is being obscured by the trees.

This image was taken using a Pentax P30 SLR film camera. The film used was Fujicolor C200, a budget-priced film (expire date April 2014) processed by Jessops in Barnstaple. The negatives were scanned using an Ion Pics 2 SD.

The beauty of using 35mm film cameras and film is not knowing what you have taken a picture of straight away – the final image is a process of design, skill and chance. The chance element is the big buzz … Continue reading ?


Self Portrait of the Artist

A self portrait is a representation of an artist, drawn, painted, photographed, or sculpted by the artist. Although self-portraits have been made by artists since the earliest times, it is not until the Early Renaissance in the mid 15th century that artists can be frequently identified depicting themselves as either the main subject, or as important characters in their work… Continue reading →

Public Art – is it the promotion of bad art?

Puerto Calero - Lanzarote
The term public art refers to works of art (in any media) that have been planned  with a specific site in mind – usually installed outside and visible to all.

The need to display art in a public place is usually driven by the ego of a local authority or prominent business or public figure within in a community. Placing grandiose statements within a town or city is seen as a way of increasing the importance of a place. There is a misconception that art elevates and rejuvenates an area – this is incorrect. There is more bad public art than there is good – out of proportion statues of footballers for an example.

The public art I like is the simple three-dimensional representation of company logos – signage is great public art.

The term public art is especially significant within the art world, amongst curators, commissioning bodies and practitioners of public art, to whom it signifies a particular working practice, often with implications of site specificity.

Image above – Puerto Calero – Lanzarote

I have no idea what the sculpture placed in the entrance to Puerto Calero marina is all about (I don’t really need to) I love the way it simply sits there and is being obscured by the trees.

This image was taken using a Pentax P30 SLR film camera. The film used was Fujicolor C200, a budget-priced film (expire date April 2014) processed by Jessops in Barnstaple. The negatives were scanned using an Ion Pics 2 SD.

The beauty of using 35mm film cameras and film is not  knowing what you have taken a picture of straight away – the final image is a process of design, skill and chance. The chance element is the big buzz … Continue reading ?

Lanzarote – self portrait

Reflection
This image was taken using a Pentax P30, 35mm film camera, which uses manual focus lenses with the K-mount bayonet fitting. The lens used to take this photograph was a Rikenon 1:2 50mm, which was originally off a Richo KR-10 (super). At about 510 grams, the camera is easy to carry and handle and has shutter speeds from 1/1000 of a second to 1 second. The automatic mode on this film camera chooses the best shutter speed and aperture setting, giving the novice photographer a better chance of taking a good photograph. It also has a semi-automatic mode as well, which chooses most of the settings but allows for more creativity. There is also a totally manual setting for the brave.

The film used was Fujicolor C200, a budget-priced film (expire date April 2014) processed by Jessops in Barnstaple. The negatives were scanned using an Ion Pics 2 SD.

Using old film stock in a Pentax P30

Expat web design services – Lanzarote
Are you an English speaking web site owner or a Spanish speaking business who require a website written and optimised for UK clients? …

Pentax P30 in Lanzarote

Still Life - an empty bottle tells a story by 35mm_photographs
Just got back from a week in Lanzarote with the whole family.

Tías in Lanzarote is a town and borough situated in the southwest of the island of Lanzarote in the Canary Islands, Spain.  It has several great bars and restaurants, supermarkets and shops that cater for the British ex-pat community that has grown up there and is southeast of the main highway which links it to Arrecife (the island capital) which is only ten to fifteen minutes away.

The  image above was taken using a Pentax SLR film camera:

The Pentax P30 uses manual focus lenses with the K-mount bayonet fitting. At about 510 grams, the camera is lightweight, with shutter speeds from 1/1000 of a second to 1 second. The automatic mode on this film camera chooses the best shutter speed and aperture setting to give the novice photographer (me) the best possible chance of taking a good photo. It also has a semi-automatic mode as well, which chooses most of the settings but allows for more creativity. There is also a totally manual setting for the brave.

Using old film stock in a Pentax P30

The beauty of using 35mm film cameras and film is not  knowing what you have taken a picture of straight away – the final image is a process of design, skill and chance. The chance element is the big buzz … Continue reading →

Photographs – an omen or just a darkroom error?

French women at Dartington train station 1976

Here is another negative I found that isn’t perfect. Taken in 1977 on Dartington railway station. This reminds me of the movie ‘The Omen’ – each victims photograph had a white line through them, one was decapitated another, Father Brennan attempted to seek shelter from a storm in a church, but the door is bolted shut. A lightning bolt strikes the church steeple and is impaled by a large steel rod which falls from the roof .

I wish I could remember the woman’s name in the stripey hoodie, the other was my French landlady  of the time in  Exmouth,  Evette.

Trains and the French woman’s name I forgot

A girl called Carol and landscape drawing

Girl washing hair Scilly Isles 1976

The picture above is of a girl called Carol who I went with to St Martins in the Scilly Isles in May 1977. I did loads of drawings there and took lots of photos of her in landscapes – but I can’t find them.

“ Tricks are I’m sure what landscape painting is all about.” Read more…

Old Sketchbook – Prince Charles on a Trimaran off St Marys During May 1977 – I skived off Art College and spent a few days on St Martins in the Scilly Isles …. The reason I gave to my tutors for my ‘holiday’ was I wanted to do … Continue reading →

Images taken with a Pentax SP1000 35mm film camera

These images taken of Woolacombe were done using  a Pentax SP1000 35mm camera. This camera was my father’s, who bought it from new in the 1970s. All Pentax Spotmatics (SP) use the M42 screw-thread lens mount. The lenses are focused at maximum aperture to give a bright viewfinder image for focusing, then a switch at the side stops the lens down and switches on the metering to enable the exposure to be set prior to shutter release.

View down into WoolacombeMy beautiful pictureView down into WoolacombeView down into Woolacombe

I’m really getting into lens flare which is usually caused by a very bright light source, either affecting the image or shining into the lens, which produces a haze. I also like the slightly over cooked vintage feel of these images, scratches, dust, and fibre strands -35mm film is far more fun than digital.

Ilfracombe Harbour

The image above was taken in Ilfracombe – June 2012

I ruined the photos of breakfast on the Orient Express

As I  have previously mentioned, I haven’t used a 35mm camera for years. I took my old, trusty Pentax K1000 with me to Venice on the Orient Express and took some black and white shots of the train…. The images below are of breakfast on the Orient Express, which is served to passengers in their cabins.

I  processed the film in the darkroom at West Buckland School. I’d remembered most of the processing guidelines I’d learnt in the 1970s and I had a foolproof instruction sheet, with timings for the Ilford HP5 (400 asa) etc. – nothing could go wrong.

Half way through processing the film I noticed a chink of light coming in from below the door – the film was ruined but here are a couple more photographs that might be interesting?

The Pentax K1000 is an almost all metal, mechanically (springs, gears, levers) controlled, manual-focus SLR with manual exposure control. It was completely operable without batteries. It only needed batteries (one A76 or S76, or LR44 or SR44) for the light metering information system. This consisted of a center-the-needle exposure control system using a galvanometer needle pointer moving between vertically arranged +/– over/underexposure markers at the right side of the viewfinder to indicate the readings of the built-in full-scene averaging, cadmium sulfide (CdS) light meter versus the actual camera settings. The meter did not have a true on/off switch and the lens cap needed to be kept on the lens to prevent draining the battery when the K1000 was not in use.

Pentax K1000. (2012, May 31). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:26, June 8, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pentax_K1000&oldid=495230110

Travel – 35mm images go wrong in Venice

View to St Marks Square

This gallery contains 4 photos.

I haven’t used a 35mm camera for years. I recently decided to take my old Pentax K1000 with me to Venice. I took some great black and white shots from our hotel window, looking out over the Grand Canal towards … Continue reading ?

Pentax K1000 – darkroom failure

view_st_marks_square

This gallery contains 4 photos.

I haven’t used a 35mm camera for years. I recently decided to take my old Pentax K1000 with me to Venice. I took some great black and white shots from our hotel window, looking out over the Grand Canal towards … Continue reading →

The Pentax K1000 (originally marked the Asahi Pentax K1000) is an interchangeable lens, 35 mm film, single-lens reflex (SLR) camera, manufactured by Asahi Optical Co., Ltd. from 1976 to 1997, originally in Japan. It uses a horizontal travel, rubberized silk cloth focal plane shutter with a speed range of 1/1000 second to 1 second, along with Bulb and a flash X-sync of 1/60 second. It is 91.4 millimetres tall, 143 mm wide, and 48 mm deep, and weighs 620 grams. The body was finished in black leather with chrome trim only, although early production Pentax K1000 SE bodies had brown leather with chrome trim.

English: Pentax K1000 SE, photographed by me. ...
English: Pentax K1000 SE – Public domain. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)