Tag Archives: Paint

Onions, 1881 – 2014 #tarot = #painting

20140513-200009.jpgTarot: The reversed 9 of cups is a signal to go deeper into the painting. Look beyond surface appearances and things that seem like coincidences or accident. What might spirit/the universe/God be trying to tell you? Make a point to deepen – or to begin – your spiritual practice in whatever way you are drawn to do so. There is more to a still life than meets the eye.

I have been inspired to paint, people have excited me and non-verbally encouraged me. I saw a painting by Renoir entitled ‘Onions’ at the Royal academy a few years ago…

Onions, 1881 is a painting of just six plain onions and some garlic and is a remarkable sensuous still life, their papery skins explode with colour and shape, making something from the ordinary magical and interesting. The lack of content and minimal subject matter belies the exuberant and controlled, skillfully executed gem. I wish I had painted it.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir - Oignons
Pierre-Auguste Renoir – Oignons (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Memories: Renoir, dead birds and rubber gloves, stolen kisses, life, stillness, pouches of Chinese fresh drinking water, broken dreams, lost lovers, onions, sections of discarded fishing nets strewn across the tourist beach, lovers in the darkness groping for the dark, hands first finding spaces, then they find there mark, my father, my ghost, my hopes and dreams, stinking of rotting carcasses [Read More]

I painted the one below this week:

imageParadigm: Clients are always shocked when I suddenly present to them a ‘painting from life’ – I appear to produce slap-dash imagery as my main artistic process, this isn’t because I haven’t mastered the basic fundamental skills of ‘traditional’ painting and drawing because I have and I am more than able to produce paintings in a typical style or pattern of work; a pattern or mode of working, arranged in order to form semantic constructions and express relations(hips) to the real world.

onions

Any person who calls themselves an #artist should be ashamed of themselves – because they are a #liar.

powerThe only true pursuit for the creative process is the creation of the commodity. There are no such things as art schools, public art and art galleries, they are simply empty vessels containing and perpetuating the (economic) elitist stranglehold on the common man’s freedom to think for himself.

The powerful use art to bludgeon the weak into submission by edifying their wealth with totems and monuments to their self glory. [Read More]

Any person who calls themselves an artist should be ashamed of themselves – because they are a liar.

(Commodity) art is created for and by the wealthy.

Painting has always been dead: Rubber gloves, stolen kisses, pouches of Chinese fresh drinking water, broken dreams, the constant questioning and declassification of what art is and what the content is has lead to this so called crisis in painting (there has always been a crisis in painting) – Painting is dead – the exponents of Conceptual Art tried to destroy the art object but failed – thought and the idea is the object. The primary aims of Conceptual Art in the 1960?s was to carry out a theoretical examination of ‘art’ and through understanding propose ‘concepts as art’, sections of discarded fishing nets strewn across the tourist beach, lovers in the darkness groping for the dark, hands first finding spaces, then they find there mark, my father, my ghost, my hopes and dreams, stinking of rotting carcasses [Read More]

Peter Bright (aka This Window) – homo symbolicum

…to be able to imitate the real world is useful when trying to turn your back on it.

Peter Bright (aka This Window)
Peter Bright (aka This Window)

A degree of pressure can give you the ‘edge’ and help you to effectively perform but excessive stress and worry can reduce your productive output and make it difficult to make the right decisions.

Paradigm: Clients are always shocked when I suddenly present to them a ‘painting from life’ – I appear to produce slap-dash imagery as my main artistic process, this isn’t because I haven’t mastered the basic fundamental skills of ‘traditional’ painting and drawing because I have and I am more than able to produce paintings in a typical style or pattern of work; a pattern or mode of working, arranged in order to form semantic constructions and express relations(hips) to the real world

Artists and teachers have argued for years that to fully understand the processes required in creating non-representational art, a knowledge of basic representational ‘tricks’ is vital – to be able to imitate the real world is useful when trying to turn your back on it.

Memories: Dead birds and rubber gloves, stolen kisses, pouches of Chinese fresh drinking water, broken dreams, sections of discarded fishing nets strewn across the tourist beach, lovers in the darkness groping for the dark, hands first finding spaces, then they find there mark, my father, my ghost, my hopes and dreams, stinking of rotting carcasses [Read More]

The Defeatist: I have never been a true artist. The naked truth is I have been and still am a liar. The pointlessness of producing art for decoration and pleasure is a perverted masturbation fantasy – a process for the deluded mind. Art and its prettiness have no place in any intellectual society – it has no place in a capitalist society …

The only true pursuit for the creative process is the creation of the commodity. There are no such things as art schools, public art and art galleries, they are simply empty vessels containing and perpetuating the (economic) elitist stranglehold on the common man’s freedom to think for himself.

The powerful use art to bludgeon the weak into submission by edifying their wealth with totems and monuments to their self glory.

Any person who calls themselves an artist should be ashamed of themselves – because they are a liar.

There is no such thing as an artist – I am a painter, I create decorations for walls.

 

#Divorce and the #afterlife – a painting proposal

Wistman's Wood
Wistman’s Wood

Memories:

Dead birds and rubber gloves, stolen kisses, pouches of Chinese fresh drinking water, broken dreams, sections of discarded fishing nets strewn across the tourist beach, lovers in the darkness groping for the dark, hands first finding spaces, then they find there mark, my father, my ghost, my hopes and dreams, stinking of rotting carcasses and seaweed, paintings of objects, places, people and dreams. I think I am back!

Interiors:

Life has changed, I have lost the familiarity I had of interiors, objects and experiences (but this is actually very liberating).

People:

Support and understanding (love even). Waking up on sofas, stumbling back to my temporary home. Meeting new people who have inspired and have opened my eyes to new (and not so new) things. Love, hope, care, faith, determination…

 

Wistman’s Wood:

Wistman’s Wood is a magical place (I visited again last weekend) it is where pitted stone becomes knotted oak and the moss and lichens weld everything seamlessly together. I have found calmness and a really odd inner strength in that place. I’m not that into ‘finding God’ or ‘finding myself’ but it is a place that forces these contemplations and ideas (punching you in your back) into your consciousness, making you wake up and get on with it.

I have struggled to regain my ‘voice’ with my painting, I have however been inspired by a series of events that have given me a jolt (made me truly feel again) and believe in myself. The self doubt has gone and I have realised that I should stop bleating and get on with my life (and my Art).

Divorce is a gut wrenching thing to go through – there is always that cloud hanging over your head that smothers you with an overwhelming sense of failure. Yes it is tough but…

I have begun a series of paintings based on the things that have inspired, disappointed and shaped my afterlife after failure:

 

Sketch in oil paint 2012

Oil sketch on board 2012 (smaller than A4)

I’m not sure why I have painted this image but…

We were given a potted pepper plant and I have loved watching the peppers grow, changing colour from green to red. I took loads of photos of it but decided to see if I could paint it in oils. I have done three versions of the same plant, two on board and one on canvas – the image above is the first sketch.

An oil sketch or oil study is an artwork made using oil paints, abbreviated in handling and looser than a ‘finished painting’. Originally these were created as preparatory studies or modelli, to gain approval for the design of a larger commissioned painting. They were also used as designs (working drawings) for specialists in other media, such as printmaking or textiles. The concept of a free-flowing painting became acceptable as an independent (finished) work, with no thought of it needing to be ‘finished’.

Sometimes you just have to get back to basics and do a simple still life – returning back to the basic skills of painting a real subject is an interesting exercise – even if not very rewarding.

Sketching: Other common tools for making marks include graphite pencils, pen and ink, inked brushes, wax color pencils, crayons, charcoal, chalk, pastels, markers, styluses…

It could be argued that photocopying machines and printers can create sketches.

PeppersThe photograph above was taken with my Pentax K1000 35mm camera.

Painting out is painting in. #printmaking

I have begun to work over a screen printed canvas (the painting below is the one I have reworked) in the studios of West Buckland School, to illustrate/show a student how to edit a painting. It is important to remove all the noise from a image to get to a meaningful statement – too much clutter, to much overkill detracts the eye from the real deal.

The image above is a photograph I took with a Pentax Spotmatic 35mm camera using ‘old stock’ (March 2000) Agfacolor HDC 200 film. My current preoccupation with 35mm film photography as taught me to look at things again – capturing the odd moment or peculiar juxtaposition. The colours and layout are similar to the painting I have created from the screen printed painting below (I will post the finished painting image soon).

“Reflections Ilfracombe Harbour Jubilee Day 2012?

The composition of this painting is based on a Union Jack and is a combination of screen printing and painting.

The reflections in the harbour in Ilfracombe always amaze me – the dirty sea water mixed with the vivid colours of the reflected boats, the bobbing flotsam and jetsam, the sunlight and oil spills.

I am sinking into poverty – make an offer on my art (please)

Times are really tough and I am quickly slipping into oblivion.

Allergy #11

Original painting by Peter Bright . Media: Painting and Screen Print on canvas, signed and dated. Price includes frame. Size: 403mm x 503mm
£Offer

“Allergy #11″ was started in November 2003 and completed in April 2011. This painting was originally created for a solo exhibition in The Queen’s Theatre during 2003 but was not exhibited due to lack of wall space.

solo exhibition is an exhibition of the work by only one artist. Having solo shows of one’s artwork marks the achievement of success.  My shows are usually of my current work or pieces from a single time period, or representative work from different periods in my development. This  illusion of success doesn’t mean I am successful – I am actually sinking deeper and deeper into poverty so if you can help me keep a roof over my head please make an offer for this painting here .

1978: I once had a girlfriend called Anne who wore ‘Charlie’ perfume. Every time we came close I sneezed. This was not conducive to a passionate affair. Her ‘big’ permed hair and ‘page three’ figure was always out of reach, until we discovered I was allergic to her bottled smell….later we discovered I was allergic to latex.

Peter Bright (aka This Window)

My art for free

This image is a version of a lithograph I did in 1978. To download it (high resolution) click on the image. This print was manipulated using Photoshop in 2002 and exhibited in 2004. The original lithograph, which is framed and … Continue reading →

This was the place where I booed lecturers who spewed bullshit

painting_studio_exeter_college_of_art_march2012The derelict painting studios in Exeter College of Art looked smaller than I remember – these were the spaces where I learnt my painting skills and the place where I was told to forget my painting skills. Those were the days when art was promoted as an intuitive process and not a prescriptive target driven qualification.

On the floor below the studio, directly underneath was the library, now devoid of shelves and books. All that information, inspiration and knowledge gone.

lecture_theatre_exeter_college_of_art_march2012The lecture theatre still had its seating but its projection screen was missing. This was the place where I booed lecturers who spewed bullshit and I think I met Sir Terry Frost (?) – the place where I rediscovered Pollock and was seduced by Rothko, learned about Fox Talbot and watched some ridiculous interview reenactments based on articles published in magazines…

Institutional Traits 2012 -Exhibition

Sarah Bennett used this empty vessel to install ‘Institutional Traits (Series 2)’ which comprised of two large printed photographs of the empty lecture theatre. The lighting in the space was (and always was) simple – controlled by two light switches, one that puts the lights on at the back and one that put them on in the front. The two images mounted on the sides of the theatre reflected the lighting options, one was of the lights on in the front and one  was with the lights on at the back.

Institutional Traits 2012

This corridor brought back memories:

In 1977 I was asked to ‘crew’ for a video (in those days the equipment was huge, I had to carry a box the size of a suitcase). The video was of the processes involved in producing meat in a slaughterhouse, I did this for a painter who was creating images based on dead things.

I witnessed the slaughtering of pigs, lambs and beef cattle. The video shoot was over three days and although horrific it was surprising how quickly I adapted to the mass slaughter – the analogies between what I witnessed and the images of Jewish concentration camps during the Second World War were obvious – what I was surprised with was the speed in which such volumes of livestock could be processed.

Peter Bright (aka This Window)

2002 #archive #paintings #drawings

The Radiographer

430mm x 700mm

 Vinyl, acrylic and oil paint on corrugated card. 

(Woolacombe July 2002)

This is the first in a series of ‘drawings’ I made using coloured transparent tapes.  A good friend of mine was working at the North Devon Hospital, as a junior doctor. She was the catalyst for these drawings. The hierarchy of the hospital system fascinated me. I would really like to see one or all of this series exhibited in a hospital or surgery.

Drawing is a visual art that makes use of any number of drawing instruments to mark a two-dimensional medium. Common instruments include graphite pencils, pen and ink, inked brushes, wax color pencils, crayons, charcoals, chalk, pastels, markers, stylus, or various metals like silverpoint.

The Consultant 540mm x 790mm

 Vinyl, acrylic and oil paint on corrugated card. (Woolacombe July 2002)

There are eight images in the ‘Hospital’ series.

An artist who practices or works in drawing may be referred to as a draftsman or draughtsman.

The most common support for drawing is paper, although other materials such as cardboard, plastic, leather, canvas and board, may be used. Temporary drawings may be made on a blackboard or whiteboard, or indeed almost anything. The medium has also become popular as a means of public expression via graffiti art, because of the easy availability of permanent markers.

Drawing. (2012, January 13). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11:33, February 4, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Drawing&oldid=471216587

The Quay ( 3 canvases size 450mm x 300mm)

Acrylic and oil paint on canvas. (Woolacombe/Bromsgrove July 2002)

Made these simple paintings to explore organic shapes and colours. I also wanted to see if I could explode/echo/repeat motifs across several paintings, to create a logical transition with a suggestion of language and rhythm. The inspiration for these paintings is the quay/harbour area of Ilfracombe in North Devon. I am fascinated by the way the tides move and change the landscape, a constant moving swell, every moment a different image. The colours and light of Devon have changed my approach towards painting; the dullness of the industrial Midlands has now been replaced with the clean, pure colours of my Woolacombe home.

#Paintings 2007 – #Allergy

paintings
These two paintings above were exhibited in the exhibition at Landmark Theatre, Ilfracombe, North Devon, UK (3rd September 2007 – 7th October 2007) both images were sold and are in private collections.

In many respects I was influenced by the Abstract Expressionists and Gerhard Richter.

Gerhard Richter at the  Tate

Since the 1960s, Gerhard Richter has immersed himself in a rich and varied exploration of painting. I’m looking forward to going to this exhibition. His career has been defined by versatility and innovation, his work covers virtually every painterly discipline … Continue reading →

Allergy Landmark Theatre, Ilfracombe, North Devon, UK Click here for press review of my exhibition in 2007

Download/View the Video of the Exhibition 4th Sept. 2007 Windows Media File (low res. 2.51mb) QuickTime (high res. 28.08mb) Depending on your connection speed this may take some time.

ARTIST + S T A T E M E N T …

The fashion for gardening, for an asthmatic, is a cruel joke. We have been ‘doing’ the garden at our home and I made the mistake of planting several climbing plants – I now know I have another contact allergy! Yet again concrete is the only true solution to my problems. The larger paintings in this exhibition are based on the colours these climbing plants go when you spray them with weedkiller.

Image from 2010

  • Action Painting – Pollock. Print dribbled paint.
  • Soft pink landscapes (1980) Richard Hamilton A landscape of soft focus and toilet paper – a turgid landscape. Collotype and Screenprint – text and image. A  remembered exhibition.
  • Rediscovering the printing process after nearly 40 years has been an interesting process – disappointingly modern inks are not as rich in colour (earthy colors are very plastic like) and modern water based inks don’t become part of the surface, they sit on it, which is incredibly frustrating – the reason I took up printing in the first place was because of the absorbed flatness of the pigments.