Tag Archives: Ilfracombe

Weedkiller Over Clematis

clematisAlthough research into chemical herbicides began in the early 20th century, the first major breakthrough was the result of research conducted in both the UK and the US during the Second World War into the potential use of agents as biological weapons. The first modern herbicide, 2,4-D, was first discovered and synthesized by W. G. Templeman at Imperial Chemical Industries. In 1940, he showed that “Growth substances applied appropriately would kill certain broad-leaved weeds in cereals without harming the crops.” By 1941, his team succeeded in synthesizing the chemical. In the same year, Pokorny in the US achieved this as well.

Weedkiller Over Clematis (Oil paint on canvas)

paintings
These two paintings above (Weedkiller Over Clematis) were exhibited in the exhibition at Landmark Theatre, Ilfracombe, North Devon, UK (3rd September 2007 – 7th October 2007) both images were sold and are in private collections.

Blurb from exhibition: The fashion for gardening, for an asthmatic, is a cruel joke. We have been ‘doing’ the garden at our home and I made the mistake of planting several climbing plants – I now know I have another contact allergy! Yet again concrete is the only true solution to my problems. The larger paintings in this exhibition are based on the colours these climbing plants go when you spray them with weedkiller.

Memories: Renoir, dead birds and rubber gloves, stolen kisses, life, stillness, pouches of Chinese fresh drinking water, broken dreams, lost lovers, onions, sections of discarded fishing nets strewn across the tourist beach, lovers in the darkness groping for the dark, hands first finding spaces, then they find there mark, my father, my ghost, my hopes and dreams, stinking of rotting carcasses, scars, cat scratch, twig scratch, dog nip, fights, electric hand tools, knife slips, broken bottles and broken hearts. [Read More]

Verity Ilfracombe – Bad public art?

Verity stands triumphantly, defending Ilfracombe’s harbour – justice and truth. The truth sadly is Ilfracombe (a seaside town) is dying, the ‘kiss me quick’ tourist trade that came down the M5 has gone elsewhere or stays at home.

Damien Hirst has done more than anybody to help kickstart the regeneration of North Devon, sadly his genius will not be enough – he can’t to do it on his own.

If you go into his bar/restaurant a few metres away there are a couple of smaller versions of Verity standing either side of the bar – well worth a look.

Why is most public art crap?

The term public art is especially significant within the art world, amongst curators, commissioning bodies and practitioners of public art, to whom it signifies a particular working practice, often with implications of site specificity. The need to display art in …Continue reading →

 

Reflections Ilfracombe Harbour Jubilee Day 2012 – Number #2

The image above is of a worked over screen printed canvas (the painting below is the one I have reworked). It is important to remove all the noise from an image to get to a meaningful statement – too much clutter, too much overkill detracts the eye from the real deal. Read more…

Great news – #printing blogs

The Church of EnglandMy blog has reach number 1 in the top printing blog charts today.

Has Jesus cast out the money lenders from the temple or is he charging rent?

This is the print of mine that was exhibited at Cheim & Read, 547 W 25th Street, NY (January 2012)

I was delighted to be included in this exhibition which also featured artworks by Jeff Koons, Yoko Ono, John Waters, Donald Baechler, Marilyn Minter, Ed Ruscha, Polly Apfelbaum, Adam Fuss and Kiki Smith .

 


Methodology doesn’t describe specific methods; nevertheless it does specify several processes that need to be followed. These processes constitute a generic framework. They may be broken down in sub-processes, they may be combined, or their sequence may change … Continue reading ?

Painting out is painting in. #printmaking

I have begun to work over a screen printed canvas (the painting below is the one I have reworked) in the studios of West Buckland School, to illustrate/show a student how to edit a painting. It is important to remove all the noise from a image to get to a meaningful statement – too much clutter, to much overkill detracts the eye from the real deal.

The image above is a photograph I took with a Pentax Spotmatic 35mm camera using ‘old stock’ (March 2000) Agfacolor HDC 200 film. My current preoccupation with 35mm film photography as taught me to look at things again – capturing the odd moment or peculiar juxtaposition. The colours and layout are similar to the painting I have created from the screen printed painting below (I will post the finished painting image soon).

“Reflections Ilfracombe Harbour Jubilee Day 2012?

The composition of this painting is based on a Union Jack and is a combination of screen printing and painting.

The reflections in the harbour in Ilfracombe always amaze me – the dirty sea water mixed with the vivid colours of the reflected boats, the bobbing flotsam and jetsam, the sunlight and oil spills.

Drawing from 1978 – exhibited in Illfracombe as part of a major event

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The image above is a drawing I did in 1978, which is part lithograph and part sketch in oils. It is now part of an exhibition in the coastal town of Ilfracombe.

Over this weekend, in the Landmark Pavilion, Sea Ilfracombe will be hosting a major event, which will include exhibitions from professional artists, as well as artwork from Ilfracombe’s schools and community college.

Images taken with a Pentax SP1000 35mm film camera

These images taken of Woolacombe were done using  a Pentax SP1000 35mm camera. This camera was my father’s, who bought it from new in the 1970s. All Pentax Spotmatics (SP) use the M42 screw-thread lens mount. The lenses are focused at maximum aperture to give a bright viewfinder image for focusing, then a switch at the side stops the lens down and switches on the metering to enable the exposure to be set prior to shutter release.

View down into WoolacombeMy beautiful pictureView down into WoolacombeView down into Woolacombe

I’m really getting into lens flare which is usually caused by a very bright light source, either affecting the image or shining into the lens, which produces a haze. I also like the slightly over cooked vintage feel of these images, scratches, dust, and fibre strands -35mm film is far more fun than digital.

Ilfracombe Harbour

The image above was taken in Ilfracombe – June 2012

2002 #archive #paintings #drawings

The Radiographer

430mm x 700mm

 Vinyl, acrylic and oil paint on corrugated card. 

(Woolacombe July 2002)

This is the first in a series of ‘drawings’ I made using coloured transparent tapes.  A good friend of mine was working at the North Devon Hospital, as a junior doctor. She was the catalyst for these drawings. The hierarchy of the hospital system fascinated me. I would really like to see one or all of this series exhibited in a hospital or surgery.

Drawing is a visual art that makes use of any number of drawing instruments to mark a two-dimensional medium. Common instruments include graphite pencils, pen and ink, inked brushes, wax color pencils, crayons, charcoals, chalk, pastels, markers, stylus, or various metals like silverpoint.

The Consultant 540mm x 790mm

 Vinyl, acrylic and oil paint on corrugated card. (Woolacombe July 2002)

There are eight images in the ‘Hospital’ series.

An artist who practices or works in drawing may be referred to as a draftsman or draughtsman.

The most common support for drawing is paper, although other materials such as cardboard, plastic, leather, canvas and board, may be used. Temporary drawings may be made on a blackboard or whiteboard, or indeed almost anything. The medium has also become popular as a means of public expression via graffiti art, because of the easy availability of permanent markers.

Drawing. (2012, January 13). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11:33, February 4, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Drawing&oldid=471216587

The Quay ( 3 canvases size 450mm x 300mm)

Acrylic and oil paint on canvas. (Woolacombe/Bromsgrove July 2002)

Made these simple paintings to explore organic shapes and colours. I also wanted to see if I could explode/echo/repeat motifs across several paintings, to create a logical transition with a suggestion of language and rhythm. The inspiration for these paintings is the quay/harbour area of Ilfracombe in North Devon. I am fascinated by the way the tides move and change the landscape, a constant moving swell, every moment a different image. The colours and light of Devon have changed my approach towards painting; the dullness of the industrial Midlands has now been replaced with the clean, pure colours of my Woolacombe home.

#Paintings 2007 – #Allergy

paintings
These two paintings above were exhibited in the exhibition at Landmark Theatre, Ilfracombe, North Devon, UK (3rd September 2007 – 7th October 2007) both images were sold and are in private collections.

In many respects I was influenced by the Abstract Expressionists and Gerhard Richter.

Gerhard Richter at the  Tate

Since the 1960s, Gerhard Richter has immersed himself in a rich and varied exploration of painting. I’m looking forward to going to this exhibition. His career has been defined by versatility and innovation, his work covers virtually every painterly discipline … Continue reading →

Allergy Landmark Theatre, Ilfracombe, North Devon, UK Click here for press review of my exhibition in 2007

Download/View the Video of the Exhibition 4th Sept. 2007 Windows Media File (low res. 2.51mb) QuickTime (high res. 28.08mb) Depending on your connection speed this may take some time.

ARTIST + S T A T E M E N T …

The fashion for gardening, for an asthmatic, is a cruel joke. We have been ‘doing’ the garden at our home and I made the mistake of planting several climbing plants – I now know I have another contact allergy! Yet again concrete is the only true solution to my problems. The larger paintings in this exhibition are based on the colours these climbing plants go when you spray them with weedkiller.

Image from 2010

  • Action Painting – Pollock. Print dribbled paint.
  • Soft pink landscapes (1980) Richard Hamilton A landscape of soft focus and toilet paper – a turgid landscape. Collotype and Screenprint – text and image. A  remembered exhibition.
  • Rediscovering the printing process after nearly 40 years has been an interesting process – disappointingly modern inks are not as rich in colour (earthy colors are very plastic like) and modern water based inks don’t become part of the surface, they sit on it, which is incredibly frustrating – the reason I took up printing in the first place was because of the absorbed flatness of the pigments.

11 The Quay

Sometimes you just have to stop and have a beer.I am surrounded by Damien Hirst’s paintings in a restaurant in Ilfracombe – very fab.

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